How to Start a Kettle Corn Business

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Kettle corn is salty, sweetened popcorn. During the American colonial era, this tasty snack gained popularity. These pioneers made kettle corn in a cast-iron kettle over a wood fire. You can start a kettle corn business with low initial investment and creative marketing skills.

A kettle corn stand can be found at many fairs and social gatherings. Sugar was sprinkled on top of the kettle corn, later replaced with honey, molasses, or cane sugar. The flavor is a slightly sweet and salty combination.

Recipes to use

Kettle ingredients are simple. Popcorn, salt, corn oil, and a sweetener are required. It is critical to practice making kettle corn with various sweeteners before starting your kettle corn business.

White sugar, for example, will give the kettle corn a popcorn ball flavor. On the other hand, brown sugar imparts a caramel flavor to kettle corn. Honey, molasses, raw sugar, and sugarless sweeteners such as stevia or sucralose are other options.

Equipment and Supplies

Purchase a National Sanitation Foundation-certified kettle corn cooker for your kettle corn business (NSF). Choose whether you want to pop the corn out of your kitchen or buy a mobile unit. The mobile unit may attract more customers because of its delicious aroma while cooking.

Certain supplies are required. The cookers, for example, can become extremely hot. It is best to wear cooking safety equipment such as long-sleeved shirts, goggles, face masks, covered shoes, gloves, and aprons to reduce injuries. Plastic bags, wooden paddles, propane tanks, a sifting bin, and a corn scooper are also required.

Creative Marketing

Because kettle corn became popular in the United States during the colonial period, dressing in colonial-era attire while selling the corn would be eye-catching for your kettle corn business. Traveling to craft shows, festivals, and fairs to sell colonial popcorn made exactly what our forefathers did—a tasty historical snack sold by a person dressed in a historical costume.