Nokia Success Story I History I Founder I CEO

Nokia’s success story is one of the most incredible business stories of the twentieth century. The year of the company’s formation is thought to be 1865. Frederic Idestam, a mining engineer, received permission to build a wood factory near the Nokia River on May 12, 1865. The number of employees at the wood mill grew over time, and a city of the same name grew up around the factory.

A small factory grew into a national conglomerate in a short period of time. Paper products from other countries were sold in Russia, France, England, and China.

In 1871, the company was renamed Nokia Corporation. The company’s products are confidently conquering markets in Germany, Denmark, France, Poland, and Russia. “Rubber fever” first appeared in the United States in the 1830s, but ended as unexpectedly as it began.

Many of the investors went bankrupt, causing them to lose millions of dollars. But one of the failed investors, equipment manufacturer Charles Goodyear (Philadelphia), did not give up and he continued to experiment with rubber.

Many of the investors went bankrupt, causing them to lose millions of dollars. But one of the failed investors, equipment manufacturer Charles Goodyear (Philadelphia), did not give up and he continued to experiment with rubber. He discovered the phenomenon of vulcanization in 1839.

He also contributed to the development of waterproof rubber, a material that can be worked in a variety of environments.

Frank Seiberling founded the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company in 1898, which grew to become the world’s largest rubber company ten years later. Rubber products first appeared in Finland near the end of the nineteenth century.

The first rubberized fabric products were shoes and other items. Such items were initially considered a luxury, but galoshes and raincoats quickly became popular among the rural population.

He discovered the phenomenon of vulcanization in 1839. He also contributed to the development of waterproof rubber, a material that can be worked in a variety of environments. Frank Seiberling founded the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company in 1898, which grew to become the world’s largest rubber company ten years later.

Rubber products first appeared in Finland near the end of the nineteenth century. The first rubberized fabric products were shoes and other items. Such items were initially considered a luxury, but galoshes and raincoats quickly became popular among the rural population. Rubber products have become a topic of discussion not only in the consumer market but also in the business market.

The industrialization of the industry created a demand for various equipment, as well as a demand for various rubber products. FRW was the market leader in the manufacture of rubber products at the time (Finnish Rubber Works). When the company’s management decided to relocate production to Helsinki, they chose a location close to Nokia. The ability to purchase cheap electricity was a deciding factor because the river located there was more than just a landscape decoration.

In 1912, the Finnish Cable Works was established in the heart of Helsinki. The active development of telephone and telegraph networks, as well as increased demand for electricity, resulted in rapid growth for the company. Following the end of World War II, the company nearly became a monopolist in the field of cable production.

The Nokia Group was formed in 1920 when the three companies Finnish Cable Works, Finnish Rubber Works, and Nokia merged to form a corporation.

Björn Westerlund, the head of the Finnish Cable Works, decreed the establishment of an electronics department focused on semiconductor research in the 1960s. The newly formed electronics department was primarily staffed by qualified specialists from colleges and universities. Kurt Wikstedt, the department’s head, had a perfect vision of all the possibilities for the development of electronic communications and was able to competently direct the efforts of developers in the right direction.

The first telephone was invented in 1963, and the first data modem was invented in 1965. The year 1969 saw the introduction of a PCM transmitter that met the International Advisory Committee for Telephone and Telegraph standards (CCITT).

The transition to digital telecommunications standards was a critical strategic decision for them, as evidenced by the release of the DX 200 switch in the early 1970s. The DX 200 included an Intel microprocessor and a high-level computer language. The switch proved to be such a successful invention that the ideas previously incorporated into it remain the foundation of the company’s telecommunications structure to this day.

Simultaneously, the government permitted the installation of mobile phones in automobiles and their connection to the public network. New opportunities compelled the company to take decisive action in the 1980s. Nordic Mobile Telephony (NMT) cellular communication first appeared in 1981, quickly covering Finland and Sweden’s territory. Later, it spread to other countries, both within and outside of Europe.

Nokia’s technologies served as the foundation for the cellular communication system. The mobile phone market grew quickly, and the NMT device, which debuted in 1981, became the first widely accepted standard for mobile communications.

Prior to 1987, all cell phones were quite large and heavy. Nokia introduced a lightweight and portable mobile phone, allowing it to capture a large portion of the market.

The late 1980s saw the gradual unification of European markets, necessitating the development of a single standard for digital mobile communications. The standard is known as GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications).

To improve the GSM network, Nokia formed an alliance with two Finnish telecommunications giants in 1989. Radiolinja was founded by Tampere Telephone Company and Helsinki Telephone Corporation to compete with Telecom Finland, which had a state-backed long-distance telephony monopoly. Radiolinja, a newly formed organization, paid more than $50 million for Nokia’s infrastructure, despite the fact that Nokia did not even have a license for the new communications. On July 1, 1991, Finland’s Prime Minister made the first GSM call using a Nokia phone.

Since 1996, the primary field of activity has been telecommunications. Finns did not take risks in vain. Nokia, a small country’s company, has invested in GSM, defying accepted telecommunications standards and well-established infrastructure, infrastructure that has been heavily invested in. Nokia will soon enter into agreements with nine more European countries to provide them with a GSM network. By August 1997, the company had provided the GSM network to 59 telecom operators in 31 countries.

It is worth noting that production in Finland has dropped significantly by this point. Nokia decides to eliminate all departments involved in the production of televisions and satellite receivers, despite the fact that it was the third-largest producer in Europe, and to focus all resources on the production and scientific areas of telecommunications.

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